SmartTots Pediatric Anesthesia Neurotoxicity Panel

SmartTots_panelists_(2)

(From left to right: Dr. Andrew Davidson, Dr. Merle Paule, Panel Moderator Dr. Randall Flick, Dr. Vesna Jevtovic-Todorovic, and Dr. David O. Warner)

Session Details

Sunday, May 20, 2012

Moderator: Randall Flick, MD, MPH, Affiliate Advisory Council Member, SmartTots, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

Panelists:

Anesthesia and the Developing Brain: What are Our Options?
Vesna Jevtovic-Todorovic, MD, PhD, MBA, Scientific Advisory Board Member, SmartTots, Professor of Anesthesiology and Neuroscience, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia

Learner Objective: After participating in this activity, the learner will be able to: (1) Identify the mechanisms responsible for anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity; (2) Focus on most vulnerable cellular targets responsible for anesthesia-induced neuronal death; and (3) Assess possible protective strategies which would enable safe use of anesthesia in our youngest patients.

Preclinical Neurotoxicity Assessments of Pediatric Anesthetics: Translational Approaches Using a Nonhuman Primate Model
Merle G. Paule, PhD, Scientific Advisory Board Member, SmartTots and Director, Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas

Learner Objectives: After participating in this activity, the learner will be able to: (1) Describe the vulnerable periods during the rapid growth of the brain during which general anesthetics are likely to have their most deleterious effects in rodent and primate models of development; (2) Describe the duration (weeks, months, years) over which the adverse effects of developmental exposures to general anesthesia on cognitive function have been shown to manifest in animal models; and (3) Describe in general the kinds of cognitive deficits that have been observed in animal models after single, albeit prolonged, episodes of general anesthesia during the brain growth spurt.

Human Studies: Is There Evidence For An Association Between Anesthesia In Early Childhood and Neurobehavioral Outcome?
Andrew J. Davidson, MBBS, MD, FANZCA, Director of Clinical Research, Royal Children’s Hospital, Senior Staff Anaesthetist, Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Children’s Hospital; Associate Professor, Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne; Head of Anaesthesia Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute; Associate Editor, Anesthesiology; Section Editor, Pediatric Anesthesia

Learner Objectives: After participating in this activity, the learner will be able to: (1) Identify the evidence for and against an association between anesthesia in early childhood and later neurobehavioral outcome in humans; (2) Identify the limitations in determining the strength of association; and (3) Discuss the difficulties in determining causation in these cohort studies.

What is Needed to Resolve the Question of Whether Animal Studies Apply to Children?
David O. Warner, MD, Affiliate Advisory Council Member, SmartTots, Professor of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

Learner Objectives: After participating in this activity, the learner will be able to: (1) Articulate the concept of translation as applied to the relationship between model and human studies; (2) Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various study designs in this area; and (3) Formulate a conceptual research agenda to resolve this question.